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20121010
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days but it would take three long weeks for those ends to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience, to never give up and never give in but keep your eyes on the prize, so this book, "across that bridge," is about patience, about steady hope, truce, love and reconciliation. when i was growing up in alabama, visit the tuskegee and later starred in national tennessee and lived in alana. sissons salles white men, colored men, white women, colored women. when i was a child with my mother, father, parents and grandparents why? and they would say that's the way it is. don't get in the way. don't get in trouble. but 1955 at the age of 15i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king, jr.. at the age of 17 aye rosa parks. the next year at the age of 18i met dr. martin luther king jr.. the action of rosa parks to the people of montgomery and teaching the leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way to get in trouble so for more than 50 years i've been in trouble, unnecessary trouble. [applause] so, across that bridge is a lesson about getting in trouble, and that's wha
, the civil war and the civil rights era, which brings this nuanced exploration into the 20th century. as we approach the sesquicentennial of the proclamation, wait brings to light how american writers brought their own perspectives to bear on the centennial of the war. how they grapple with the issues it raised unhealthy influence public number and commemoration of the word to varying degrees. the four writers from the southern novelist and essayist, robert penn warren to recant his view of the civil war is a lost cause midwestern historian bruce cotton causes her to norman rockwell come in part because his capacious works on the civil war were widely read at the middle of the century. northern utes in literary critic, edmund wilson looked at the war in terms of its own pacifism, often neglect in the role of race in it in the northern negro novelist james baldwin who is the most acute essayist and tinker in the american psyche hands down working at that time. blight said that all four, and i quote, are geared to say with america's tendency towards a progressive tribal sunny sense of history
with that -- "american oracle' the civil war in the civil rights era which brings this new ones exploration into the 20th century. as we approach this as quick -- sesquicentennial blight brings to light for american writers with their own perspectives to bear on the centennial of the civil war, how they grappled with the issues it raised and how they influenced public memory and commemoration of the board to varying degrees. for writers like features, southern novelists and essayists robert can want he would come to recant his view of the civil war as a lost cause, midwestern historian bruce catton whom andrew and company calls it sort of literary norman rockwell in part because his capacious works on the civil war were widely read at the middle of the century, northern elite and literary critic edwin wilson who looked at the war in terms of his own pacifism often neglecting the world of race and it and the northern novelist and essayist james baldwin who was the most acute essayist and thinker of race on the american psyche hands down working at that time. blight said in an interview with the chronicle
. we can do both. to civil rights. one is the right to never be prevented or intimidated from voting. we had a history in many states. poll tax, literacy test, bizarre registration hours. we passed the civil rights law to prevent that. the second city right not to have your vote canceled up by someone who is an illegal alien, and died, voting twice, or someone who does not even exist. that to file its your sole rights. we can do both. now, an obstacle to this is to reference the previous speaker on fast and furious, the eric holder justice department. they claim there is no voter fraud america. the clinical want to poll taxes. eric holder himself said that. they are suing any state that they can sing their voter i.d. lot is unconstitutional even and has been up held by the supreme court. so where are we with the lyrical the justice department? a complete stall. well, this is no accident. the president of the united states got his start with these issues. his first major political challenge chicago for barack obama was with a group called project vote, a voter registration effort that
important novel for african-americans to articulate civil rights. it exhibited an enormous influence not just and other writers but on leaving political figures and social activists. so without "uncle tom's cabin" you rich without strong, written very much to model. he wanted to model his work during the reconstruction era after "uncle tom's cabin." james baldwin famously in 1955 publishers the screen against "uncle tom's cabin." but for him, too, in the 1950s he says no novel has ever exerted over him like the power of "uncle tom's cabin." it's the sentimental power of this novel that last very much to the present day. >> watch booktv all weekend to see more of our recent visit to augusta, maine. for more information on this and other cities visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> antonio mendez presents his book, "argo," at the international spy museum in d.c. arco details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia off
when the rising tide with the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of people might age were heading down to mississippi to break the back of segregation in. i was living in cambridge at the time. this was the 1960's. a volkswagen bug. i drove across town into the black community. i was never there before. although i had grown up just outside of boston. a revered figure of the black community both the associative doctor came and i asked him may i be of use? he said yes, young man. you can. i am glad you came here to talk with me in your own home town. you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice. you can find the struggle here. come into our schools to help our children. i walked into the headquarters and said i will be a teacher. and had never heard of certification. [laughter] i knew nothing about teaching. they did not teach you anything useful at harvard. they still don't. [laughter] the first day i taught they sent me to teach kindergarten. the first time i ever taught in my life. i was terrified. i had no idea what you do with people that size. they we
became clear. obama's suffered on the civil-rights movement and of the new left. he determined to experience them vicariously. he tried drugs as he confessed and hence autobiography, "dreams from my father." rallied against south africa , political speeches, community organizers, tried to get in touch with the black experience a and in general search for meaning to use a formulation he could not to reject. he shared the 60s existentialist mood everyone must find his own meaning in life and find his own way. there is no meeting out there zero or objective source that one can point* to zero or rely on. he shared the determination to make history rather than and let it happen or to redeem in justice. roswell obama share the post modernist suspicion of the universal values are not universal and probably not true. one can see these ideas that work in "dreams from my father" the highly fictionalized memoir. politicians notoriously live. not a surprise. no future president ever boasted he was making stuff up to tell the story he -- the way he wanted to tell it. self creation is a very
in the summer that year when the rising tide in the fight for civil rights swept across the nation. thousands of young people my age or heading to mississippi to try to break the back of segregation in the south. i was living in cambridge at the time. one day i simply got in my car. this was the 1916s. it was a little par. and i drove across town into the black community. i had never been in the black community before although i had grown up just outside of boston and i went to a minister, a wonderful man, some of you may recall his name. a revered figure in the black community and some close associate of dr. king and i asked him simply may i be of use? and he said yes, young man, you can. and he said i am glad you are here to talk to me in your own home town because you don't need to go to mississippi to find injustice in america. he said you can join the struggle here. come into schools and try to help our children. i walked into the headquarters of boston public school and said i am going to be a teacher. i had never heard of certification. i knew nothing about teaching. didn't teach anyth
. he missed out on the civil rights movement, and on the new left. but he determined to experience them vicariously. and so he tried drugs, as he confesses in his autobiography. he rallied against south africa, he gave political speeches, he community organized, he tried to get in touch with the black experience, and in general, he searched for meaning to use a formulation that he would not reject. in other words, he very much shared the '60s mood that everyone must find his own meaning in life. and find his own way in life. because there's no meaning out there, there's no objective source of meaning that one can point to or rely on. he shared the right to make history rather than to let it happen or trust it to redeem in justice in the own good time. and as well obama, i think, shared the post modernist suspicious that universal values, as he sometimes calls them, are not universal, and probably not true in any objective sense. one can see these ideas at work in dreams for my for, the heavily fictionalized autobiography or memoir he wrote. now politicians are known to lie. this is not
strong. right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s. army was. during the civil war the army expanded to. 3-million people. 2 and a half people or so in the north. and this meant that the amount of case work that he had to oversee was extraordinary and he also was given responsibility for pursuing civilians who were engaged in disloyal acts. treason behavior and so on. he didn't pursue every case. he didn't serve on every case himself. obviously a lot of court marshall went on the field. it was his responsibility to make sure that justice was -- as much as he could that justice was prevailing in the cases and punishment was being weeded out as it should be and people's rights were being protected. it was a massive assignment that went way past the end of the war. he stayed in the position until 1875 pfs it a expanded position. he had the role in that that position of making law. so much law about war didn't even exist because this was a war the likes of which the the united states had never see. so many, many policy around how the war should be conducted and it needed to be c
, he had his right arm amputated after the civil war. and here is one of him as a father, his grandsons and sons follow them into military service, this is very late in life for him. finally, and ultimately, a group shot that shows him right there, along with all the great men of the time who formed the board for bowdoin college. the chamberlain who also, to civil war service, was shown in this picture. he is right there. so those are the two gentlemen. chamberlain and howard were two years apart. chamberlain was class of 52, howard was class of 50. he did share a dorm, but not a dorm room. so we really don't know too much in the early years about whether they were friendly. certainly, later in life, they were. finally, a picture of howard along with other distinguished alums, including chief justice [inaudible name], next to howard, who is also here at bowdoin. this is a nice, gentle motion of the late 19th century. social life in a small town in maine. this is a letter from christmas morning, 1861, howard at the time was in camp california, which is out of the outset of washington dc.
of mothers and accommodation in the church in washington, d.c.. set about right after the civil war and determining how they could provide help particularly to blacks and a variety of disadvantaged in the d.c. area and initially establish what was a seminary and that very quickly martin to the university. so, howard university was founded. you put them on the reservation it would be okay but in terms of his treatment of blacks and his involvement he's also called the christian general because depending on the perspective he was either very powerful or very righteous. he did expect that his troops would comport themselves in the highest christian manner that there are also suggestions he was preaching and maybe not the easiest guy to live with and when you really want to do is smoking cigarettes and have a drink. the reich righteousness i think carries him without life and he makes no apologies for ret but he's also a singled out because of it and certainly on many of the biographies that have been published. ultimately i mentioned earlier that he was the superintendent of west point
strong. you know, right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s. army was. during the civil war, the army expanded to, you know, 3 million people, two and a half million or so in the north, and this meant that the amount of case work that he had to oversee was extraordinary, and he also was given responsibility for pursuing civilians who were engaged in disloyal acts, treasonnist behavior and so on. although, he didn't pursue every case or serve on every case himself, obviously, a lot of court marshalls on the field and so on, it was his responsibility to make sure as much as he could justice was prevailing in the cases and that punishment was meeted out as it should be and people's rights were protected. it is a massive assignment way past the end of the war. he stayed in that position until 1875 so-dramatically expanded position, and he also had the role in that position of making law, so much law about war didn't even exist because this was a war of the likes which the united states had never seen. to many, many policies around how the war should be conducted and so it needed
tribe members to the reservation. a rather and curious howard noticed that his right arm is gone. he had amputated during the civil war. insert a very hard with two of his grandsons, all of whom have fallen into military service. this is very, very late in life for him. and then finally i'm ultimately, a group shot that shows howard sitting right there, along with all the great white men who at the time formed the visiting board for bowdoin college. josh malone chamberlain, who also was a renowned civil war service is also shown in this picture. he is right there. so those are the two gentlemen. chamberlin and howard were two years apart. chamberlain was five for 52, howard class of 50. they came to have not interacted much when they were here. they do share a dorm, but not a dorm room. so we didn't know too much in the early years about whether they were friendly. certainly later in life they were. and then finally, a picture of howard along with other distinguished alums, including chief justice fuller, who was seated next to howard they are, who is also a member of the board at the ti
an issue for a human-rights but almost a black hole of modern civilization it is a huge problem proliferation commented bn -- wmd, counterfeiting, s tate-sponsored terrorism, it is astonishing it is not a huge issue in general but a nuclear arms state during the election year. that we keep pushing under the rug there will be a day when north korea is free. it will come within those will realize there could have been more that we could have done in the is where were some anticipated we have overwhelming evidence that anybody could access. there was nothing during the holocaust many people set would have acted differently but today everybody watching this you can find concentration camps. joseph showed me the route he took every day. the fact that he can do that means we have overwhelming evidence of what is happening. but when you look bacteria has accomplished it can do extraordinary things going for the most impoverished country to the tenth largest in 60 years. with a korean-americans have accomplished. it never got that freedom the first half of the 20th century is old news b
and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civilization a rise and began to make use of those harbors and rivers they were obvious so help us think about why it's the geography we spoke upon based to the cultural with the supposition one aspect. >> phyllis do ha and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the development of technology will let shortened the distance it did not negate geography. it needed more precious and important as it opened up a new geography to the world conflict system and world trade system. culture and economics and people flow from the geography because what is culture? the accumulated experience of people on the landscape over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to the traditions and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i have the a identifiable culture is remaining. nobody can mistake that there is a remaining culture that's been formed by the conflict between the inva
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)